Category

Ghana

Collective bargaining: a tool for industrial harmony in Ghanaian industrial settings

By | Ghana, Social dialogue

Collective bargaining has been recognised in almost all industrial settings as the most civilised way of resolving industrial conflicts and disagreements. The main objective of this paper is to determine the extent to which collective bargaining can effectively minimise industrial conflicts in Ghana, with particular reference to the brewery industry in Ghana. It is a means of helping to foster cordial management-labour relationships towards industrial harmony. The study was carried out with a focus on Ghana Breweries Ltd. The results of the study show that collective bargaining is a powerful and effective tool that can be used to minimise industrial conflicts and disagreements in industrial establishments. It is therefore recommended that employers should encourage the formation of trade unions to promote collective bargaining. It is further recommended that both management and labour should recognise collective bargaining as an effective tool for resolving conflicts and disagreements at the workplace.

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Developmental Relevance of Social Dialogue in Ghana

By | Ghana, Social dialogue

TUDCN has undertaken three national case studies in Ghana, Indonesia and Uruguay to analyse social dialogue within the countries in its various forms, with particular focus on the formalisation of these dialogues at different administrative levels and its contribution to development. The studies are authored by national trade union specialists and include examples of good practice as well as of limitations of the different contexts.

The Ghana case study puts forward the role of institutionalised social dialogue in increasing the minimum wage. It also highlights how other forms of social dialogue, including consultations and discussions, have contributed to the elaboration of the Poverty Reduction Strategy; of national employment, youth and social protection policies; and to the inclusion of social partners on the governing boards of public institutions.

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Social Dialogue in Developing Countries

By | Angola, Brazil, Case-study, Costa Rica, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mozambique, Social dialogue, South Africa, South Korea, Vietnam, Zambia

This is a study of Social Dialogue in developing countries. It was commissioned by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad) on behalf of the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) in November 2010. It was prepared by Michael Fergus, partner in Nordic Consulting Group AS. The purpose of the study is to map experience with dialogues on socio‚Äźeconomic issues between government and organisations in productive sectors, and possibly civil society organisations, in selected developing countries. In countries where a system of social dialogue has been established the study also assesses whether the experience is of interest for other countries to learn from. Norway may then consider supporting some form of interaction between countries in the South. It is not the purpose of the study to try to assess whether the Norwegian model of social dialogue can be copied into different political systems and cultures.

 

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Social Dialogue in times of crisis: Finding better solutions

By | Belgium, Brazil, Case-study, Chile, Czech Republic, Ghana, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, Niger, Panama, Peru, Poland, Singapore, Social dialogue, South Africa, Sweden, United States

This paper looks at past economic crises to identify lessons that can be learned from industrial relations developments in different regions and varying circumstances. The paper describes the development of social dialogue in the early period of the current crisis in order to inform the reader about the forms and content of crisis-related social dialogue in different parts of the world and to provide national examples. It concludes by suggesting policy options. The paper also contains tables of national and enterprise-level cases documenting the role of social dialogue and industrial relations in addressing the employment impact of the crisis.

 

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