Tag

Supply chain

Violence @ work: A guide for SMEs to prevent violence in the workplace

By | Guide, Social dialogue

CNV International and the Netherlands Enterprise Agency present a new publication Violence @ work, a guide to prevent violence in the workplace.

The factsheet aims to support preventing and eliminating violence. It informs about characteristics of violence in the workplace, as well as its causes and effects. The guide provides tips to tackle and discourage violence at work in effective ways.

By sharing workplace initiatives of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), brands, unions and other key players, this guide explains how companies can contribute to the elimination of violence at work in their international supply chain. It helps SME’s to take steps to create a positive working environment where violence will not be tolerated.

For the original source, please click here.

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Enterprise Sustainability and HRM in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

By | Social dialogue

Abstract

This chapter looks at the specific challenges, expectations and opportunities small medium-sized enterprises in emerging countries face regarding enterprise sustainability in today’s worldwide economy characterized by the strong interconnection of supply chains. In its experience with small enterprises development in emerging countries, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has recognized that quality human resource management (HRM) and good workplace practices are a key determinant of enterprise performance and productivity, as well as in practice at the community, national or even international level. Based on the ILO’s Decent Work Agenda (ILO, Decent work, report of the ILO Director-General, 87th session of the International Labour Conference. ILO, Geneva, 1999), the Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work (Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. ILO, Geneva, 1998) and the technical cooperation experience of ILO’s Job Creation and Enterprise Development Department, the HRM practices described here are intended to improve enterprise sustainability, understood in its economic, social, and environmental dimensions. Practical examples from the ILO’s practice demonstrate the implementation of labour rights in SMEs in emerging countries.

 

For the original source, please click here.

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CSR Risk Analysis for International Business Activities

By | Social dialogue

The CSR Risk Check tool is aimed at companies that are exporting to, importing from or have production facilities in foreign countries.

About MVO Nederland & International CSR

MVO Nederland is the Netherlands’ national knowledge hub and networking organisation for corporate social responsibility (CSR). Going by our motto of ‘changing together,’ we inspire, connect and strengthen affiliated companies and industry organisations in their process of evolving towards sustainable operations. As a partner of MVO Nederland, the numerous events and networking sessions we organise, while our range of practical tools will help you put CSR into practice. Visit our website for a full list of the benefits of partnering with MVO Nederland (in Dutch), as well as further information about our activities in various areas of CSR, such as International CSR (ICSR). More specific information is available on the Dutch version of the website.

For the original source, please click here.

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A practical CNV Guide to the RUGGIE principles

By | Case-study, Indonesia, Macedonia, Netherlands, Nigeria, Social dialogue, United States

Introduction: an important resource

Is this a situation you recognise? For some years you have been negotiating with the branch or a supplier of a large international company which by now has also firmly established itself in the ‘low wage countries’. You negotiate about collective bargaining agreements and you can’t manage to reach a good consensus about wages and working conditions for employees. Even though you know that the company
has arranged these things properly in its country of origin. So what do you do?

As a trade union leader you have a particular responsibility within your company, sector or industry: you protect and promote labour rights. It’s certainly not easy to protest against abuses or wrongs at the local branches of foreign companies.

With the help of your international network of trade union organisations and your status as a partner organisation of CNV Internationaal, you can in fact play an important role here. That’s because the CNV trade unions work to benefit people and the environment, and look further than the national boundaries. After all, CNV leaders, officials or members of the Works Council are active within international companies in the Netherlands that also operate branches abroad or purchase from foreign suppliers. Sustainability and international solidarity are two of CNV’s core values. We believe it is important that employees’ human rights are respected all over the world.

 

For the original source, please click here.

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Vietnam country study: Labour Standards in the Garment Supply Chain

By | Case-study, Social dialogue

Introduction

The present country study on Vietnam, has been carried out in June 2016 for CNV Internationaal in the context of the
Partnership for Supply Chain Transformation. It is based on desk and original research on the current status of the industry structure, social dialogue, gender-based violence and living wage debates in the apparel industry in Vietnam for use in the first phase of this project.

The Fair Wear Foundation with its alliance partners CNV Internationaal and FNV Mondiaal has been selected by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs for a five year Strategic partnership for Garment Supply Chain Transformation starting 2016 as part of its “Dialogue and Dissent” policy framework. The primary goal of this initiative is to improve the lobbying and advocacy capacity of Trade Unions and labour related NGOs by enhancing their understanding of international RMG supply chains, access to critical information and know-how. Opportunities will be identified to develop pilot experiences in the supply chain resulting in good practices related to living wages, gender-based violence and freedom of association and collective bargaining, which will facilitate more effective social dialogue and monitoring of human rights compliance at the factory level and reinforce the value of NGOs and trade unions to all supply chain stakeholders.

 

For the original source, please click here.

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Pakistan country study 2016: Labour standards in the garment supply chain

By | Pakistan, Social dialogue

Executive summary

The present country study on Pakistan, has been carried out in December 2016 for CNV Internationaal in the context of the Partnership for Supply Chain Transformation. It is based on desk and original research on the current status of the industry structure, social dialogue, gender-based violence and living wage debates in the apparel industry in Vietnam for use in the first phase of this project. The Fair Wear Foundation with its alliance partners CNV Internationaal and FNV Mondiaal has been selected by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs for a five year Strategic partnership for Garment Supply Chain Transformation starting 2016 as part of its “Dialogue and Dissent” policy framework.

The primary goal of this initiative is to improve the lobbying and advocacy capacity of Trade Unions and labour related NGOs by enhancing their understanding of international Ready Made Garments supply chains, access to critical information and know-how. Opportunities will be identified to develop pilot experiences in the supply chain resulting in good practices related to living wages, gender-based violence and freedom of association and collective bargaining, which will facilitate more effective social dialogue and monitoring of human rights compliance at the factory level and reinforce the value of NGOs and trade unions to all supply chain stakeholders.
This report gives insight into the garment/ textile industry of Pakistan and its related industry, labour laws, industrial
relations and industry. The study was developed after a desk study and a subsequent visit to Pakistan to interview
stakeholders on issues related to the garment industry.

 

For the original source, please click here.

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Country study Cambodia 2016: Labour Standards in the Garment Supply Chain

By | Cambodia, Case-study, Social dialogue

The present country study on Cambodia, has been carried out for CNV Internationaal in the context of the Partnership for Supply Chain Transformation. is based on desk and original research on the current status of the industry structure, social dialogue, gender-based violence and living wage debates in the apparel industry in Cambodia for use in the first phase of this project.

The Fair Wear Foundation with its alliance partners CNV Internationaal and FNV Mondiaal has been selected by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs for a five year Strategic partnership for Garment Supply Chain Transformation starting 2016 as part of its “Dialogue and Dissent” policy framework. The primary goal of this initiative is to improve the lobbying and advocacy capacity of Trade Unions and labour related NGOs by enhancing their understanding of international RMG supply chains, access to critical information and know-how. Opportunities will be identified to develop pilot experiences in the supply chain resulting in good practices related to living wages, gender-based violence and freedom of association and collective bargaining, which will facilitate more effective social dialogue and monitoring of human rights compliance at the factory level and reinforce the value of NGOs and trade unions to all supply chain stakeholders.

 

For the original source, please click here.

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Paying a Living Wage: a Guide for Companies

By | Guide, Kenya, Social dialogue

Introduction

As a company owner, you want your employees to earn enough to make a decent living so they can provide for themselves and their families. Sounds obvious, right? Well, not always. When you do business in developing countries or emerging markets, this may not be so easy to achieve. In many of these countries, the vast majority of workers and their families struggle to survive on wages that are not sufficient to cover their daily subsistence needs. How can you contribute towards improving this situation and work towards living wages? This brochure will help you get started.

 

For the original source, please click here.

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Corporate Social Responsibility in International Production Chains

By | Cambodia, Guatemala, Madagascar, Social dialogue

Justice, solidarity, responsibility, sustainability and compassion are the five core values CNV Internationaal uses as a touchstone for everything we do. Every day, CNV Internationaal aspires to improve the working and living conditions of people in our partner countries. Many of the products we buy here are produced in these partner countries, where there is little protection of workers in terms of income, working conditions and safety. Eight-year-old children are sent down the cobalt mines, people working in forestry do not get a hard hat and safety shoes, people work 16 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you don’t agree with something or ask probing questions, you lose your job. And workers often have no right to associate and negotiate a collective bargaining agreement.

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The Freedom of Association Protocol A localised Non-Judicial Grievance Mechanism for Workers’ Rights in Global Supply Chains

By | Indonesia, Social dialogue

This report is part of a series produced by the Non-Judicial Human Rights Redress Mechanisms project, which draws on the findings of five years of research. The findings are based on over 587 interviews, with 1,100 individuals, across the countries and case studies covered by the research. Non-judicial redress mechanisms are mandated to receive complaints and mediate grievances, but are not empowered to produce legally binding adjudications. Te focus of the project is on analysing the effectiveness of these mechanisms in responding to alleged human rights violations associated with transnational business activity. The series presents lessons and recommendations regarding ways that:

  • non-judicial mechanisms can provide redress and justice to vulnerable communities and workers
  • non-government organisations and worker representatives can more effectively utilise the mechanisms to provide support for and represent vulnerable communities and workers
  • redress mechanisms can contribute to long-term and sustainable respect and remedy of human rights by businesses throughout their operations, supply chains and other business relationships.

The Non-Judicial Human Rights Redress Mechanisms Project is an academic research collaboration between the University of Melbourne, Monash University, the University of Newcastle, RMIT University, Deakin University and the University of Essex. The project was funded by the Australian Research Council with support provided by a number of nongovernment organisations, including CORE Coalition UK, HomeWorkers Worldwide, Oxfam Australia and ActionAid Australia. Principal researchers on the team include Dr Samantha Balaton-Chrimes, Dr Tim Connor, Dr Annie Delaney, Prof Fiona Haines, Dr Kate Macdonald, Dr Shelley Marshall, May Miller-Dawkins and Sarah Rennie. The project was coordinated by Dr Kate Macdonald and Dr Shelley Marshall. Te reports represent independent scholarly contributions to the relevant debates. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the organisations that provided support. This report is authored by Tim Connor, Annie Delaney and Sarah Rennie. Correspondence concerning this report should be directed to Tim Connor, tim.connor@newcastle.edu.au.   To see the original document, click here.

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